lauantai 3. marraskuuta 2012

Pesäpallo - Finnish baseball


 
This week's Sepia Saturday's source for inspiration is a photo of Irish Revolutionary Leader, Michael Collins, at the Senior Hurling Championship match against Dublin on September 12, 1921. He's talking to the Kilkenny hurlers at Croke Park in Dublin.
 
Hurling is not familiar to me but I think it is as popular among Irish people  as pesäpallo ( Finnish baseball ) is for us.

One of the sportive specialities of Finland is our own version of baseball! We can call ”pesäpallo”a cousin of that American one as this game is a combination of traditional ball-batting team games and American baseball. This sport is quite popular in our country and rooted profoundly in the history of Finland as a nation and in the everyday life in the regions of country ! This game is also enjoyed by all Finns in schools, parks and fields as a hobby, which can be played by everybody! This game was developed by Lauri ”Tahko” Pihkala in the 1920’s and in the summer 2012 pesäpallo celebrated its 90th anniversary! 

I'm not really intrested in any kind of sport,
but I like these photos of baseball players with hats.
My brother was eager sportsman and he collected pictures
 from sport magazines and newspapers.
 These pictures are from his collections.


From "Ostrobothnia Sports 1956":
Finnish baseball players in 1922 from our neighbor village, Kauhajoki.
 
 
 
From "Finland's Sport Dispatch 1956":
It is serious game, even with kids.
The boy on the ground has succeeded to reach the home base and the batter ( batsman ) is joying. The pitcer at the back is not happy at all. The ball is sill on thr back field.  ( sorry, the vocabulary of Finnish baseball is a little difficult for me to translate in English )
 
 
 
 From "Finland's Sport Dispatch 1958":
This batter is specialized in snap ( short ) hits.


 
From "Sports Picture Magazine 1959":
The manager is giving last tips for the players.  
 


 
 
 
And of course there must be a World Cup! This year it was held at Gold Cost in Australia.
No hats any more, the players must use helmets. 
And these are the results:
 
Pesäpallo World Cup 2012, Gold Coast, Australia.
 Women: AUS-FIN 0-2 (5-16,8-12).
 Men: AUS-FIN 0-2 (3-12,4-13).
 Mixed: AUS-Team All Stars* 2-1 (11-3,5-6,2-0).
* Players from Australia, Finland, Germany and Switzerland.
 
 
edit: This is how we pronounce the word pesäpallo - click pesäpallo:
 

 

22 kommenttia:

  1. I like the first picture best! Can you imagine running from base to base with a hat on? A cap, ok but a hat... Fortunately also in this team there are men with garters. Helen will like that :)
    Thanks for introducing me to pesäpallo. Again I learned something thanks to Sepia Saturday.

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. I liket the first picture also. Perhaps they thought that a real gentleman must take care of his appearance even in the heat of the game, wearing a hat and socks without wrinkles.

      Poista
  2. Vastaukset
    1. Sukat suorassa ja hattu päässä, kävi kuinka kävi!

      Poista
  3. I've learned a lot today about sports I never heard of! Love the first photograph: socks, no socks, baggy socks, gartered socks.

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. I'm glad you liked it. Socks and garters really look funny.

      Poista
  4. You taught me something else I didn't know about Finland. That first photo is superb for the garters alone.

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. I believe Finnish pesäpallo is not well-known around the world. It differs quite a lot from it's cousin American baseball.

      Poista
  5. Every nation has its own peculiar sports. We Dutch have korfball, your pesäpallo looks much more exciting!

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. The fans say it's exciting, because it's so fast tactical game.
      I don't like it, I just can't forget those horrible sport lessons at school and pesäpallo ;)

      Poista
  6. I never heard of pesäpallo before. I noticed some garters in the first picture.

    VastaaPoista
  7. Helen has us all focussed on socks and garters! What fun! Enjoyed learning about Finnish baseball.

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you Kathy, glad you enjoyed! And from these comments I learned a new English word I've never heard before: garters- sukkanauhat in Finnish.

      Poista
  8. Amazing, such an interesting and delightful post! I'm not really a fan of sports either, and didn't even try going there! You did a superb job!

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you Karen! I'm glad you liked it!

      Poista
  9. I didn't realize Finland played baseball. The short hit/snap is what we call a bunt - at least judging by how the player is holding the bat.

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Finnish baseball differs from American baseball a little, but both have ball and bat, and the palyers must run fast :).
      Again a new English word for me: a bunt - thank you Wendy.

      Poista
  10. Oh my but I love those stocking braces on the one fellow's legs. Quite snazzy. I had no idea there was a Finnish baseball. My local team, the San Francisco Giants, won the World Series this week though I always think that if the rest of the world isn't invited how can it be a world's series? Finland should have at least been invited.

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Yes, they are lovely, those fellows. And congratulations to the winning team. I think the difference between American and Finnish baseball would cause a little confusion among players and rules, but it might be worth to try :)

      Poista
  11. It really is funny how at one time, a man just did not feel dressed without his hat - even when he was playing sports! In that first image, the hats seem very businesslike (at least at the right end of the lineup)!

    I was very interested to learn that the Finns have their own take on baseball. I'd be curious to know how you pronounce "pesapollo"?

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Perhaps the hats made them look more like gentleman :)
      I edited my post and linked a smilebox-post, where my husband pronounces the word pesäpallo in Finnish.

      Poista